DINING ROOM

This room was the parlour in the sixteenth-century house and as such has always functioned as a place for eating and drinking. There is no surviving evidence to suggest its appearance prior to the 1760s, when the room was substantially remodelled by William Constable. He commissioned a number of designs from the architects Robert Adam (1729-98), Thomas Atkinson (1728-92) and Timothy Lightoler. Once again Lightoler secured the commission with a design centred on the figure of Bacchus.

Drawing on contemporary interest in the excavations at Pompeii and Herculaneum, it is suggested that the ceiling was modelled on an ancient Roman painting found at Gragnano. The plasterwork is by Giuseppe Cortese (1725-78), a leading Italian stuccoist based in York who worked primarily in Yorkshire. The carved doorcases are the work of Jeremiah Hargrave (1726-1786) of Hull, as are the side tables and pedestals for the sculpture. The pair of wine-coolers or cellarets, surmounted by crouching Bacchic panthers, were designed by Lightoler but executed by Hargrave. Carved in wood, they were initially painted to resemble porphyry marble and only gilded in the nineteenth century. 

Did you know?

The Burton Constable Whale is featured in Herman Melville's famous novel Moby Dick. 

Today the Burton Constable Whale is nicknamed 'Constable Moby'

 
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Historic Houses Association
heritage lottery fund natural england art fund Trip Advisor welcome to Yorkshire Historic Houses Association